Roads FAQ

Please pick the sub-category that your question is in. Select the question to see the answer.

Paved Roads:


Dirt Roads:


Construction:




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Paved Roads:

1. How can I get my road swept?
  • Please request to have your road swept by going to our Report Rio Rancho application to fill out a service request, or by calling (505) 891-7224.Please see the Road Sweeping page for more information.
2. What is pavement maintenance?
  • There are two different types of pavement maintenance. These types are microsurfacing, and mill and inlay. It is important to note that pavement maintenance is done to extend the life of the existing pavement and improve driving surfaces. It is only after the pavement’s life is near the end that a full reconstruction, completely repaving the road, will take place.
  • Microsurfacing is not new pavement but a surface treatment that extends the longevity of roads by three (3) to five (5) years. This method helps protect the road from further weather deterioration. Please note that preexisting cracks will return over time.
  • Mill and inlay is a method where approximately one and a half (1.5) to two and a half (2.5) inches of the existing asphalt is removed and then replaced.
3. Who takes care of the cracks and potholes on my road?
  • You can request to have the cracks in your road fixed by going to our Report Rio Rancho application to fill out a service request, or by calling (505) 891-7224. Cracks and potholes fall under pavement maintenance. Cracks can be fixed in two ways: crack sealing and crack patching.
  • Crack sealing is a stopgap measure to prolong pavement life by minimizing water infiltration into the base course or subgrade. Crack sealing may be used on all asphalt pavements and only in cracks that are less than or equal to two (2) inches wide. Crack sealing should be finished before Preventative Maintenance is completed.
  • Crack patching is a stopgap measure to prolong pavement life by minimizing water infiltration into the base course or subgrade. Crack patching may be used on all asphalt pavements and only in cracks that are greater than two (2) inches wide. Crack patching should be finished before Preventative Maintenance is completed.
4. Why are there cracks still visible on my road after City crews perform crack sealing?
  • There are two reasons why cracks may still be visible after City crews perform crack sealing: they may not be finished with the road yet or the crack is larger than two (2) inches in width and requires crack patching. If the crack requires crack patching, it will be completed at a later date.
5. How do I get snow removed from my road?
  • Snow is removed from major arterial roads first, then minor arterial, collector, and finally residential (if possible). Roads are classified by the amount of traffic that travels on the road and how it connects to other roads. Please see the Snow Removal page for more information.If you have any additional questions please call (505) 891-7224.

Dirt Roads:



1. How do I get my dirt road graded?
  • Roads are graded on a monthly basis. A revolving schedule was created to assist in grading each dirt road once a month. Some dirt roads are graded more often because of the high volume of traffic. You can see the revolving schedule in our Dirt Road Maintenance page.
  • Soil Stabilization is a chemical applied to the road that acts like glue. The chemical adheres the particles of dirt together and makes it possible to grade the road less often. If you have any additional questions please call (505) 891-7224.
2. How do I get my dirt road paved?
  • In order to get your dirt road paved you will have to start a Special Assessment District. You can find information by visiting our Special Assessment Districts (SAD) page. If you have further questions, please see the Miscellaneous page.

Construction:



1. Who oversees road construction in the City?
  • Road construction is overseen by four main areas: the Capital Improvements Section of the Engineering Division in the Department of Public Works, the Engineering Division of the Development Services Department (DSD), Sandoval County, and the New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT). The Capital Improvements Section takes care of road construction on capital projects, a list of which can be found on the Capital Improvement Projects page. The Engineering Division of DSD handles the road construction of new subdivisions or for commercial development. Sandoval County typically does work outside the City Limits, but occasionally does work within City Limits. NMDOT handles road construction on state roads: NM 528, US 550, and Paseo del Volcan (NM 347).
2. Where can I find current road construction delays?
  • Please see our Traffic Update page for construction delays that may be present in the City of Rio Rancho. For areas outside of Rio Rancho you may want to check the New Mexico Department of Transportation’s (New Mexico Roads).
3. Who oversees the construction on NM 528?
4. What are Capital Improvement Projects?
  • Capital Improvement Projects are City projects to maintain and improve the infrastructure of the City. Please see our Capital Improvements Section for more information.
5. How do Capital Improvement Projects get approved?
  • Capital Improvement Projects are approved by the City’s Governing Body.
6. How do Capital Improvement Projects get funded?
  • Each Capital Improvement Project is funded differently. They can be funded by a combination of grants issued by the State or Federal government, City money generated from City water/wastewater bills, or local taxes.
7. Why do Capital Improvement Projects take so long?
  • Each Capital Improvement Project has phases. These phases are typically: preliminary design, final design, and construction. Each phase takes time to complete. Each phase of the project has to be funded and approved by the City’s Governing Body. Thus Capital Improvement Projects are designed years in advance to limit the time it would take to construct the project.
8. Why do we have design criteria and standard details?
  • The Engineering Division created standard details and design criteria for City projects. This way each project has a uniform attention to detail and meets standard engineering practices.
9. How often do the design criteria and standard details get updated?
  • The design criteria and standard details are updated as needed or sometimes if other agencies update their standards.
10. Why are residential roads being dug up near the water meter?
  • Residential roads may be dug up near the water meter for two reasons: there is a leak that is being repaired or the service line is being replaced. Leaks that are present in the road are the responsibility of the City of Rio Rancho and are fixed as soon as possible, with regards to the other types of leaks that maybe present in the City. Service lines are being replaced as part of an ongoing project known as the Water Service Line Replacement Project. This project has several phases in order to replace aging service lines with new copper ones.

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